Categories
Uncategorized

How Dubai can reach 100% clean energy by 2050

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park. Dubai also launched the Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy 2050 to provide 100 per cent of its total power capacity from clean energy sources.
Image Credit: DEWA

Dubai: In October last year, the UAE launched its strategic initiative for net-zero emissions by 2050. The goal is to become the first country in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to undertake such a strategic initiative. Dubai also launched the Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy 2050 to provide 100 per cent of its total power capacity from clean energy sources.

One of the most extensive clean and renewable energy projects that Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) is implementing to achieve this target is the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park. It is the largest single-site solar park in the world, with a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030 and investments up to Dh50 billion.

When completed, the solar park will reduce over 6.5 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA, said: “The Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the largest single-site solar park in the world, is our biggest project to achieve this vision. It has a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030. The current capacity at the solar park is 1,527MW using photovoltaic solar panels.”

image

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA, said: “The Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the largest single-site solar park in the world, is our biggest project to achieve this vision. It has a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030. The current capacity at the solar park is 1,527MW using photovoltaic solar panels.”

– Saeed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA

“DEWA is implementing more projects with a total capacity of 1,333MW using solar photovoltaic and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) in addition to future phases to reach 5,000MW by 2030. The clean energy capacity share is currently around 11.4 per cent of Dubai’s energy mix, and is expected to reach around 14 per cent by the end of 2022,” added Al Tayer.

He underlined: “At DEWA, we work in line with the vision and directives of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, to promote sustainability and innovation and transform into a sustainable green economy. This is achieved by increasing the share of clean and renewable energy in line with the Dubai Clean Energy Strategy 2050 and the Dubai Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy to provide 100 per cent of Dubai’s total power capacity from clean energy sources by 2050.”

Independent power producer model

Al Tayer noted the regulatory frameworks in Dubai, which enable the private sector to take part in energy production projects, have encouraged international investors and developers to participate in the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park’s projects, which DEWA is implementing using the Independent Power Producer (IPP) model.

“DEWA has attracted investments of around Dh40 billion through this model in public-private partnerships. DEWA received the lowest solar energy prices (Levelised Cost of Energy) globally five consecutive times, making Dubai a global benchmark for solar power prices,” he said.

Reducing carbon emissions annually

The 13MW first phase became operational on October 22, 2013, comprising around 152,000 photovoltaic cells, connected to 13 transformers in inverter buildings. The output is transformed to 33 kilovolts (kV), and generates nearly 28 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity annually. The first phase contributes to an annual reduction of about 15,000 tonnes of carbon emissions.

On March 20, 2017, the 200MW photovoltaic second phase of the solar park was launched. DEWA implemented the project in partnership with a consortium led by ACWA Power from Saudi Arabia as the main developer, and Spain’s TSK as the main contractor, with an investment of Dh1.2 billion. This second phase of the solar park is now providing clean energy to around 50,000 residences in Dubai, reducing 214,000 tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Third phase

In November 2020, Sheikh Mohammed inaugurated the 800MW third phase of the solar park. DEWA implemented the third phase using the IPP model in partnership with a consortium led by Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company (Masdar) and EDF Group, through its subsidiary EDF Énergies Nouvelles at an investment of Dh3.47 billion. The facility is the first of its kind in the Middle East and North Africa region to use single-axis solar tracking to increase energy generation. It also uses other innovative technologies, including cleaning robots for photovoltaic panels to increase the plant’s efficiency. The third phase now provides clean energy for over 240,000 residences in Dubai.

The 950MW fourth phase of the park has investments totalling Dh15.78 billion. It is the largest single-site investment project that combines CSP and photovoltaic technology. It will use 700MW of CSP (600MW from a parabolic basin complex and 100MW from the solar power tower) and 250MW from photovoltaic solar panels. Upon completion, the project will have the largest thermal storage capacity in the world of 15 hours, allowing for energy availability round the clock. The 4th phase will provide clean energy for around 320,000 residences and reduce 1.6 million tonnes of carbon emissions every year.

Bidding

In November 2019, DEWA announced the consortium led by ACWA Power and Gulf Investment Corporation as the preferred bidder to build and operate the 900MW 5th phase of the Solar Park, using photovoltaic solar panels. DEWA achieved a world record by receiving the lowest bid of USD 1.6953 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for this phase. It will provide clean energy to more than 270,000 residences in Dubai and reduce 1.18 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Focus on innovation and R&D

The solar park hosts two pioneering projects: The Innovation Centre and the R&D (research and development) Centre. The Innovation Centre supports DEWA’s efforts to support innovation and creativity in clean and renewable energy and raise awareness on sustainability in addition to strengthening national capabilities and enhancing business competitiveness.

The exhibition area on the first floor focuses on DEWA’s journey, key historical inventions and innovations in electricity, and the latest developments in renewable and sustainable energy.

The R&D Centre, meanwhile, supports DEWA’s efforts to anticipate the future, develop proactive, long-term plans to keep pace with the Fourth Industrial Revolution by developing disruptive technologies. The Centre’s research areas include solar power, smart grid integration, energy efficiency, and water. The R&D Centre is the only Centre in the UAE that focuses on renewable energy, smart grid technologies and energy efficiency. It has the largest and most comprehensive solar testing and certification facility in the UAE. It operates the longest continuous testing of photovoltaic panels in the UAE in desert climate conditions.

Categories
Uncategorized

How Dubai can reach 100% clean energy by 2050

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park _1-1651752229480
Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park. Dubai also launched the Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy 2050 to provide 100 per cent of its total power capacity from clean energy sources.
Image Credit: DEWA

Dubai: In October last year, the UAE launched its strategic initiative for net-zero emissions by 2050. The goal is to become the first country in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to undertake such a strategic initiative. Dubai also launched the Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy 2050 to provide 100 per cent of its total power capacity from clean energy sources.

One of the most extensive clean and renewable energy projects that Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) is implementing to achieve this target is the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park. It is the largest single-site solar park in the world, with a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030 and investments up to Dh50 billion.

When completed, the solar park will reduce over 6.5 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA, said: “The Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the largest single-site solar park in the world, is our biggest project to achieve this vision. It has a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030. The current capacity at the solar park is 1,527MW using photovoltaic solar panels.”

image

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA, said: “The Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the largest single-site solar park in the world, is our biggest project to achieve this vision. It has a planned capacity of 5,000MW by 2030. The current capacity at the solar park is 1,527MW using photovoltaic solar panels.”

– Saeed Al Tayer, Managing Director and CEO of DEWA

“DEWA is implementing more projects with a total capacity of 1,333MW using solar photovoltaic and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) in addition to future phases to reach 5,000MW by 2030. The clean energy capacity share is currently around 11.4 per cent of Dubai’s energy mix, and is expected to reach around 14 per cent by the end of 2022,” added Al Tayer.

He underlined: “At DEWA, we work in line with the vision and directives of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, to promote sustainability and innovation and transform into a sustainable green economy. This is achieved by increasing the share of clean and renewable energy in line with the Dubai Clean Energy Strategy 2050 and the Dubai Net Zero Carbon Emissions Strategy to provide 100 per cent of Dubai’s total power capacity from clean energy sources by 2050.”

Independent power producer model

Al Tayer noted the regulatory frameworks in Dubai, which enable the private sector to take part in energy production projects, have encouraged international investors and developers to participate in the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park’s projects, which DEWA is implementing using the Independent Power Producer (IPP) model.

“DEWA has attracted investments of around Dh40 billion through this model in public-private partnerships. DEWA received the lowest solar energy prices (Levelised Cost of Energy) globally five consecutive times, making Dubai a global benchmark for solar power prices,” he said.

Reducing carbon emissions annually

The 13MW first phase became operational on October 22, 2013, comprising around 152,000 photovoltaic cells, connected to 13 transformers in inverter buildings. The output is transformed to 33 kilovolts (kV), and generates nearly 28 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity annually. The first phase contributes to an annual reduction of about 15,000 tonnes of carbon emissions.

On March 20, 2017, the 200MW photovoltaic second phase of the solar park was launched. DEWA implemented the project in partnership with a consortium led by ACWA Power from Saudi Arabia as the main developer, and Spain’s TSK as the main contractor, with an investment of Dh1.2 billion. This second phase of the solar park is now providing clean energy to around 50,000 residences in Dubai, reducing 214,000 tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Third phase

In November 2020, Sheikh Mohammed inaugurated the 800MW third phase of the solar park. DEWA implemented the third phase using the IPP model in partnership with a consortium led by Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company (Masdar) and EDF Group, through its subsidiary EDF Énergies Nouvelles at an investment of Dh3.47 billion. The facility is the first of its kind in the Middle East and North Africa region to use single-axis solar tracking to increase energy generation. It also uses other innovative technologies, including cleaning robots for photovoltaic panels to increase the plant’s efficiency. The third phase now provides clean energy for over 240,000 residences in Dubai.

The 950MW fourth phase of the park has investments totalling Dh15.78 billion. It is the largest single-site investment project that combines CSP and photovoltaic technology. It will use 700MW of CSP (600MW from a parabolic basin complex and 100MW from the solar power tower) and 250MW from photovoltaic solar panels. Upon completion, the project will have the largest thermal storage capacity in the world of 15 hours, allowing for energy availability round the clock. The 4th phase will provide clean energy for around 320,000 residences and reduce 1.6 million tonnes of carbon emissions every year.

Bidding

In November 2019, DEWA announced the consortium led by ACWA Power and Gulf Investment Corporation as the preferred bidder to build and operate the 900MW 5th phase of the Solar Park, using photovoltaic solar panels. DEWA achieved a world record by receiving the lowest bid of USD 1.6953 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) for this phase. It will provide clean energy to more than 270,000 residences in Dubai and reduce 1.18 million tonnes of carbon emissions annually.

Focus on innovation and R&D

The solar park hosts two pioneering projects: The Innovation Centre and the R&D (research and development) Centre. The Innovation Centre supports DEWA’s efforts to support innovation and creativity in clean and renewable energy and raise awareness on sustainability in addition to strengthening national capabilities and enhancing business competitiveness.

The exhibition area on the first floor focuses on DEWA’s journey, key historical inventions and innovations in electricity, and the latest developments in renewable and sustainable energy.

The R&D Centre, meanwhile, supports DEWA’s efforts to anticipate the future, develop proactive, long-term plans to keep pace with the Fourth Industrial Revolution by developing disruptive technologies. The Centre’s research areas include solar power, smart grid integration, energy efficiency, and water. The R&D Centre is the only Centre in the UAE that focuses on renewable energy, smart grid technologies and energy efficiency. It has the largest and most comprehensive solar testing and certification facility in the UAE. It operates the longest continuous testing of photovoltaic panels in the UAE in desert climate conditions.

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

How much green energy South Africa needs to produce over the next 30 years: minister

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

image

South Africa needs to install between 3,000MW – 4,000MW of renewable energy per annum over the next 30 years as part of a long-term shift toward a renewables-based power system, says Transport minister Fikile Mbalula.

This would be the equivalent of adding one of South Africa’s mid-size power stations to the grid every year.

Addressing a climate commission conference on Thursday (5 May), Mbalula said this rapid pace would allow the country to generate sufficient economies of scale for local manufacturers to produce the parts for wind and solar and utility-scale batteries.

“This manufacturing can create real jobs — not just intermittent jobs in the installation and construction, but decent permanent jobs linked to large scale manufacturing. We must invest in peaking power to provide the energy security that our country so desperately needs,” he said.

“We must continue to phase out coal, in a manner that is carefully structured and planned. Specifically, this means repurposing and repowering our existing coal plants, and creating new livelihoods for workers and communities most impacted in the change.”

The transport minister said that his department was working to ‘equip’ the automotive industry for the new opportunities of a cleaner transport system, including electric vehicles. He added that the country’s shift to green power will need the support of both the public and private sector, with a concerted push towards green funding.

“The transition will require large-scale shifts within our domestic financial system to mobilise both public and private capital for the transition, including by strengthening regulation and institutional arrangements, partnering with the public sector for delivery, and attracting capital into new markets, technologies, business models, and small and medium enterprises.”

Mbalula pointed to the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of the Eastern Cape as a sign that South Africa is not immune from the effects from climate change and global warming.

“The science is clear that climate change is happening at an accelerated pace, with profound implications on all aspects of our lives – on rainfall patterns, water resources, crop viability, food security and human health, amongst others.

“The science is also clear that we must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees celsius if we want to avoid the worst of climate impacts. To do so, we must reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically over the next three decades to reach net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.”


Read: Gordhan on why Eskom is not in a state of disaster

Categories
Uncategorized

China's Coal Capital Could Emerge As A Green Energy Poster Child

Article Republished By Javier Troconis

(MENAFN– Baystreet.ca) China’s Coal Capital Could Emerge As A Green Energy Poster Child

China is trying to have it all. As China develops the future of its energy and industrial landscapes through sweeping programs like the Belt and Road Initiatives and increasingly ambitious five-year plans and climate targets, President Xi Jinping’s administration is performing an increasingly intricate tightrope walk between trying to position Beijing at the forefront of the global clean energy industry and shoring up Chinese energy security by any means necessary – be it clean or coal. China is both the world’s biggest investor in renewable energies and responsible for half of global coal consumption. In fact, despite President Xi’s rhetoric about China’s dedication to decarbonization, Beijing’s priorities clearly lie with energy security and economic growth first and foremost. In the end, every move China makes concerning its energy sector is about propping up Chinese energy independence and weaning the country off of its dependence on foreign fuel imports. The struggle between decarbonization and energy and economic stability are not unique to China by any means. As global supply chains have remained muddied by ongoing fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic and economic sanctions against Russia in response to the war in Ukraine, countries across the globe have turned to coal to keep the lights on.
While most of those governments that have returned to coal frame it as an anomalous and temporary emergency response, the coal renaissance could be a frightening harbinger of things to come. Continued economic uncertainties, conflicts, and energy sector volatility are almost as certain as the looming threat of global warming. If the world returns to coal every time the rapidly evolving energy industry experiences growing pains or Putin threatens global democracy, the world has no hope of meeting its decarbonization goals in time to avoid the worst effects of climate change.
In one Chinese province, this global challenge is playing out on a much smaller scale. Shanxi province is China’s major coal producer. Coal mines have been dug under an eighth of the province’s entire surface area, and the coal mining industry shows no sign of slowing. Last year Chinese coal production hit yet another all-time high, growing 4.6 percent year on year as the economy bounced back from the first wave of the pandemic. But there is hope for change in Shanxi; the province which sits at the beating heart of the global coal industry could turn into the nation’s solar mecca as China tries to pivot to position the smoggy province as its energy transition poster child.
Five years ago, a 250-acre panda-shaped solar power plant opened in coal mining hub Datong, and solar capacity in the province has been expanding 63 percent per year ever since. Wind power, too, has been taking off in Shanxi, expanding 24 percent per year.“The striking alternation illustrates Shanxi’s latest role: China has tasked its coal powerhouse with modelling the transition to clean energy,” National Geographic reports.“Besides building out clean energy sources—including in particular the infrastructure to use hydrogen as a fuel—the province is supposed to conduct large-scale tests for upgrading factories and power plants and retraining fossil-fuel workers. In general, it is supposed to figure out, for itself and China, how to rid itself of its reliance on coal.”
Despite China’s best efforts, panda PR and all, coal is still unequivocally king in Shanxi and in the national economy as a whole. Renewables only represent 28% of the country’s national energy mix, and most of that is hydropower, which comes with its own considerable environmental concerns. And then there is the fact that China’s energy demand is still growing. In order for China to keep meeting demand without relying even more on foreign imports, it will have to ramp up every form of domestic energy production. For China, coal capacity can’t yet be replaced by renewable energy – it needs as much of both as it can get.
By Haley Zaremba for Oilprice.com
More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:

MENAFN05052022000212011056ID1104161617

Legal Disclaimer:
MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We do not accept any responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality, or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, kindly contact the provider above.